PEDAGOGY that embraces Indigenous ways of knowing are fostered by approaches to teaching and learning that include purposeful thinking about people, places and processes.

The word Etuaptmumk, or Two-Eyed Seeing, communicates the belief that the most beneficial outcome occurs when we consider multiple perspectives in understanding and exploring ideas. Two-Eyed Seeing helps us to acknowledge the idea of wholeness, a part of many Indigenous knowledge systems: seeing things through Indigenous perspectives (represented as one whole eye), while also seeing western ways of knowing (also represented as a whole eye), inviting these two eyes to work together as they do in binocular vision.

A weaving back and forth between knowledge systems that embrace a flow between the strengths of the two ways, to best suit the circumstances, strengthens the approach further.

The First Nations, Métis and Inuit Professional Learning website provides educators with supports and tools to design and facilitate professional learning. It offers curricular resources that build capacity, engage learners and build paths toward reconciliation through education.

The Learning to Do pillar webpage provides a wide range of professional tools and supports that engage you in professional learning to support curricular programming. This webpage includes features to help you self-assess your capacity and a photo resource gallery with numerous links to sources, websites and resources.

This gallery includes Grades 1-12 Curricular Resources in Moodle folders that are correlated to specific subject areas and grade levels. These folders include resources and activities specific to learning outcomes in core subjects. Each folder can be downloaded and imported into a Moodle server.

Supporting Pedagogies

JHC Advancing Reconciliation in Education Toolkit

The John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights (JHC) engaged in a collaborative pilot project with five schools in Edmonton Catholic and Edmonton Public Schools called Advancing Reconciliation in Education. One of their goals was to create safe spaces for Indigenous students and their peers to discuss, recommend and develop student-led initiatives that promote reconciliation in their schools and communities. One of the outcomes of the project was a toolkit that provides administration and teachers with a framework to introduce these important topics in the classroom. It is intended for grades 5 to 12 and each section has links to the Alberta Program of Studies. Access the toolkit and more information about the project here

Canadian Museum of History Online Exhibitions

The Canadian Museum of History offers a number of online exhibitions that include many focused on Indigenous histories, culture and perspectives.

FNMIEC – ATA Developed Resources

The Alberta Teachers’ Association has developed a number of resources to inform teachers and schools about aboriginal curriculum outcomes and to help ensure that aboriginal students succeed in school. Links to these resources can be found on this website.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Teaching Resources

This website provides activities, games and stories for youth and educators about Indigenous peoples’ culture, history and languages.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Map Room

In this section, you will find various thematic mapping products on Aboriginal people, communities and initiatives undertaken by the Department. Information is being shown using web-based interactive maps and/or cartographic static maps available in PDF format for viewing and printing purposes.

Aboriginal Peoples / Economic Development / Education / Environment and Natural Resources / Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement / Social Programs / The North / Treaties, Claims and Agreements

Indigenous Peoples of Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit

This website is a collaborative effort for engaging students in provincially-based learning activities focused on discovering Alberta’s past and building upon that to assist in shaping Alberta’s present, using SuperNet enabled technologies. Video conferencing and other blended learning technologies open the doors to new interactions for students. These interactions among students, and with experts in the field will help facilitate a deeper understanding of the interdependence of all peoples.

Our Words, Our Ways: Teaching First Nations, Métis and Inuit Learners

This Alberta Education resource provides information about First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultures and perspectives, and sample strategies for meeting the needs and recognizing the gifts of students who are First Nations, Métis and Inuit.

Supporting First Nations, Métis and Inuit Student Success (with Debbie Mineault)

The focus of this four-part series is to address the question: “How do I develop appreciation and respect for First Nations, Métis and Inuit culture, history and worldview in my classroom?” Debbie Mineault provides a unique experience combining personal insights and infusion of First Nations, Métis and Inuit culture and language using Alberta’s programs of study, Our Words Our Ways and other resources. In this archived webinar series you have the opportunity to deepen your awareness of cultural beliefs that affect teacher choices.

The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities on First Nations in Canada Ages 4 to 7

The Learning Circle has been produced to help meet Canadian educators’ growing need for elementary-level learning exercises on First Nations. It is the first in a series of four classroom guides on First Nations in Canada. Because First Nations are culturally diverse, the information in this activity book does not necessarily apply to all groups. To learn more about a particular First Nation and to get help with learning activities, teachers are encouraged to consult local Elders, cultural education centres or friendship centres. Also visit the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Kids’ Stop website for additional information.

The Learning Circle is organized in thematic units, each with its own teaching activities. Units are designed to give teachers and students simple but effective exercises, projects and activities that will encourage students to learn more about First Nations. Educators can follow some of the exercises as stand-alone units on First Nations topics, or integrate them with existing curricula on Aboriginal peoples. This resource can be accessed online on the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada website by clicking on the title, as well as in PDF format by clicking on the image.

The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities on First Nations in Canada Ages 8 to 11

The Learning Circle has been produced to help meet Canadian educators’ growing need for elementary-level learning exercises on First Nations. This is the second in a series of four classroom guides on First Nations in Canada. This resource can be accessed online on the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada website by clicking on the title, as well as in PDF format by clicking on the image.

The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities on First Nations in Canada Ages 12 to 14

The Learning Circle has been produced to help meet Canadian educators’ growing need for elementary-level learning exercises on First Nations. This is the third in a series of four classroom guides on First Nations in Canada. This resource can be accessed online on the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada website by clicking on the title, as well as in PDF format by clicking on the image.

The Learning Circle: Five Voices of Aboriginal Youth in Canada, A Learning Resource for Ages 14 to 16

Five Voices of Aboriginal Youth in Canada is the product of a series of 15 interviews from five different Aboriginal communities across Canada—three youth in each community. As an interdisciplinary, student-centred educational unit, this document is designed to enhance the understanding non-Aboriginal students have regarding issues and realities facing First Nations and Inuit youth today. The depth and complexity of the issues, history and cultures of First Nations and Inuit are not completely presented in these narratives. It is recommended that educators and students pursue and investigate additional resources to deepen and broaden their understanding.

The educational activities in this booklet meet many of the aims and goals of provincial curriculum for Aboriginal studies. The material has been designed for Grade 9 and 10 students, but can also be applied at other grade levels where Aboriginal studies and themes are taught. This resource can be accessed online on the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada website by clicking on the title, as well as in PDF format by clicking on the image.

University of Lethbridge First Nation, Métis and Inuit Curriculum Collection

The Faculty of Education sponsored the development of this First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) Curriculum Collection. It is a collection of lessons and resources designed to help pre- and in-service teachers incorporate FNMI content in their teaching across subjects and grade levels. One can browse through the collection or search by categories (e.g. subject, title, key word, grade, etc.).

It is recommended that before exploring the collection, that you take 5 minutes and review the search tutorial.

Subject-Specific Resources

Supporting Numeracy

In the Empowering the Spirit video series, students explore numeracy through Traditional Games, an elementary math class on probability and a high school physics class examining the structure of a tee pee and rocket nozzle.

Exploring Numeracy through Traditional Games

Find out how a Traditional Games Day creates a context for meaningful numeracy learning. First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples traditionally used the context of games to teach skills needed for surviving on the land. This video illustrates how this traditional way of learning can be just as valid today.

Length: 5 minutes 21 seconds

Click here for the Learning Guide

Engaging All Students through Numeracy

See first-hand how two different teachers engage their students in meaningful numeracy experiences through traditional contexts, including exploring probability through traditional rock hand games and calculating volume by examining the structure of a traditional tee pee.

Length: 5 minutes 56 seconds

Click here for the Learning Guide

Supporting English Language Arts

Sample Lesson Plans for English Language Arts

These sample English Language Arts lesson plans support Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; treaty education; and residential schools’ experiences, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study.

Each sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools’ experiences and resiliency.

Supporting Cree Language

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education: Cree Language and Culture

This Edmonton Public Schools website provides an annotated list of resources to support development and understanding of Cree language and culture.

Online Cree Dictionary

The Cree Language Resource Project (CLRP) dictionary will have the ability to translate words from English to Cree in Syllabics and Roman Orthography (Cree written in English) with explanation of how it fits in a sentence. The translated word will be associated with a picture, sound and a video clip. The goal of the project is to promote the learning and preservation of the Cree language. The online dictionary will have the ability to accommodate different regional Cree dialects.

 

Supporting Social Studies

First Nations and Collective Rights

Part 1
This lesson helps students understand why First Nation peoples have collective rights guaranteed in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms by exploring the historical roots of these rights. The lesson begins with students doing research on various treaties and the Indian Act, in order to gain the necessary background information as to why these documents were created. As they progress through the lesson, students are required to conduct research, complete a presentation and determine which document was most significant in impacting the lives of First Nations peoples. As an extension activity, students can make a list of recommendations to amend the Indian Act or a specific treaty.

Part 2
Students explore the multiple perspectives that existed at the time of the signing of various treaties and the Indian Act (circa 1876), and then create a political cartoon to demonstrate these various viewpoints. They will create a political cartoon on either a specific treaty or the Indian Act that shows the perspective of First Nations peoples, the government and non-native Canadians. Students also provide an explanation of the message of their cartoon and the techniques they used to transmit this message, and peer review another student’s cartoon.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education: Residential School Education

This Edmonton Public Schools website provides links to resources related to residential school education. It also provides links to literature related to this topic, organized by division.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Veteran EduSite

This EduSite highlights Veterans’ contributions and contains suggested lesson activities, recommended literature, website and video links and information on First Nations and Métis soldiers.

Indian Residential Schools

This lesson explores the experiences of Aboriginal children within the Residential School system in Canada. To provide students with background knowledge about Residential Schools, a PowerPoint presentation is attached. Questions, activities and research projects are provided to stimulate thought on historical significance, evidence, and continuity and change in regards to this issue in Canada today. To engage these concepts students analyze primary and secondary source documents, including a touching, personal account of a former resident of one of the residential schools in Saskatchewan.

K-12 Social Studies Program of Studies – Residential Schools and Treaties Scope and Sequence

This resource provides direct and indirect references that support teaching all students about residential schools and treaties in Alberta’s Kindergarten to Grade 12 Social Studies program of studies.

Métis People in Alberta – Then and Now

In this lesson students engage in a deliberative inquiry to research a prominent Métis person from Alberta. Teachers lead students through an exploration of the concept of historical significance. Using the criteria for historical significance, students work individually or with a partner to create a biography in a simple written format. Students are asked to draw on the information they collect to judge the historical significance of the person they studied. Students then share their findings with the class.

Sample Lesson Plans for Social Studies

These sample Social Studies lesson plans support Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; treaty education; and residential schools’ experiences, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study.

Each sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools’ experiences and resiliency.

Aboriginal Collection: A Thematic Listing of Resources with Aboriginal Content

This resource consists of bibliographic information and annotations for a selection of children’s books and other resources containing Aboriginal content. Resource listings are correlated with the Alberta Social Studies Program of Studies and are sorted by grade level. The listings include reviewer ratings and recommendations.

Supporting Science

APEGA Project: Educators Connections to FNMI Success Through Science and Curriculum

This video, developed as part of the First Nations, Metis and Inuit Provincial Professional Learning Project with the Northwest Regional Learning Consortium (NRLC) and the Alberta Regional Professional Development Consortia (ARPDC), features the APEGA Project. This project was implemented to support professional development that would address the infusion of First Nations, Métis and Inuit perspectives into the Science curriculum. Lorianne Tenove provided consultation and support through the FNMI Project and NRLC.

Sample Lesson Plans for Science

These sample Science lesson plans support Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; treaty education; and residential schools’ experiences, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study.

Each sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools’ experiences and resiliency.

Supporting Fine Arts

Sample Lesson Plans for Fine Arts

These sample Fine Arts lesson plans support Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; treaty education; and residential schools’ experiences, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study.

Each sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools’ experiences and resiliency.

Supporting Physical Education and Games

Aboriginal Games with CHS Students: Student Connections to FNMI Success

This video, developed as part of the First Nations, Metis and Inuit Provincial Professional Learning Project with the Northwest Regional Learning Consortium (NRLC) and the Alberta Regional Professional Development Consortia (ARPDC), features a series of Aboriginal Games, set up and modeled as a student project to model how these games are connected to curriculum in Alberta.