First Nations and Collective Rights

Part 1

Concept: Historical Significance

Prepared for Grade: 9

Province: AB

By: Nzingha Austin-Joyner

Time Period: 1700-1800, 1800-1900, 1900-present

Time allotment: Research 3x 50 minutes

Brief Description of the Task

Funding and support for the development of this lesson plan is the result of a grant from Alberta Education to support implementation of the K-12 Social Studies curriculum. Financial and in-kind support was also provided by the Calgary Regional Consortium (www.crcpd.ab.ca).

This lesson helps students understand why First Nation peoples have collective rights guaranteed in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms by exploring the historical roots of these rights. The lesson begins with students doing research on various treaties and the Indian Act, in order to gain the necessary background information as to why these documents were created. As they progress through the lesson, students are required to conduct research, complete a presentation, and determine which document was most significant in impacting the lives of First Nations peoples. As an extension activity, students can make a list of recommendations to amend The Indian Act or a specific treaty.

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Part 2

Concept: Historical Perspectives

Prepared for Grade: 9

Province: AB

By: Nzingha Austin-Joyner

Time Period: 1800-1900, 1900-present

Time allotment: 3 x 50 minutes

Brief Description of the Task

Funding and support for the development of this lesson plan is the result of a grant from Alberta Education to support implementation of the K-12 Social Studies curriculum. Financial and in-kind support was also provided by the Calgary Regional Consortium (www.crcpd.ab.ca).

Students explore the multiple perspectives that existed at the time of the signing of various treaties and the Indian Act (circa 1876), and then create a political cartoon to demonstrate these various viewpoints. They will create a political cartoon on either a specific treaty or The Indian Act that shows the perspective of First Nations peoples, the government, and non-native Canadians. Students also provide an explanation of the message of their cartoon and the techniques they used to transmit this message, and peer review another student’s cartoon.

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